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BENEFITS OF BEANS

Incorporating ½ cup of dry beans -- such as pinto, cannellini, kidney or black beans, into your daily diet could: 

  • Increase your life expectancy

  • Fight cancer

  • Prevent heart disease

  • Prevent and manage diabetes


Not only are dry beans full of antioxidants, they are good sources of protein, excellent sources of fiber, and naturally fat-free, sodium-free, and cholesterol-free. Many types are also good sources of potassium. 


As Americans continue to practice social distancing, more and more families are cooking at home, trying new recipes and adapting healthier routines in the kitchen.  


There has never been a better time to invest in your health.

Just add Beans for Life!

 

WHAT'S IN A HALF CUP?

Research tells us that regular dry bean consumption provides a variety of health and wellness benefits.

PROTEIN

Protein is a vital nutrient that plays a key role in maintaining and repairing the body. Beans are high in amino acids, the building blocks of protein. They are also lower in calories and saturated fat than some other protein sources, such as meat and full fat or low-fat dairy products.


A 1-cup, or 40 grams (g), serving of canned black beans provides 14.5 g of protein, 16.6 g of fiber, and 4.56 milligrams (mg) of iron.

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FOLATE

Beans contain several vital nutrients, including folate. Folate is essential for overall health and allows your body to make healthy red blood cells, and help prevent neural tube defects in a fetus during pregnancy.

 

A 1-cup, or 155g, serving of cooked black beans provides 256 micrograms (mcg) of folate.

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ANTIOXIDANTS

Antioxidants fight the effects of free radicals, which are damaging chemicals that the body produces during metabolism and other processes.

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HEART HEALTH

People who consume beans regularly may be less likely to die of a heart attack or other cardiovascular problem. Other research suggests that nutrients in beans may help lower cholesterol. High cholesterol is a risk factor for heart disease and heart attacks.


There is evidence that a high fiber diet may help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

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